Osso Table

Designed by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Mattiazzi, 2011

Marrying 21st-century technology with age-old craftsmanship, the Osso Table exudes simple sophistication and allows the oak and ash woods to express themselves fully. Manufactured by Mattiazzi—a family-owned producer of wood furniture, in Udine, Italy—where they combine refined hands-on know-how with a powerful set of solar-powered CNC tools, every piece is assembled using chemical- and treatment-free wood panels. The Osso Family includes dining chairs, stools, and tables, and all are available in a complementary palette of nine different colors.

Osso Table shown in Dark Grey Waxed Ash veneer.

Eames Molded Fiberglass Chair

Designed by Charles and Ray Eames, 1950

Thanks to a new, proprietary process for producing fiberglass, Herman Miller is once again able to fabricate the original Eames Fiberglass Chair safely. The newly reformulated material is created using a monomer- and VOC-free resin in a molding process that all but eliminates hazardous airborne compounds—and is fully recyclable through Herman Miller’s Take Back program. The chair is available in both side and arm chair versions, in eight archival colors, with a choice of wire, dowel leg, stacking/ganging, rocker, and 4-leg bases, as well as the option for upholstery.

Eames Molded Fiberglass Side Chair shown in Navy Blue, Red Orange, Lemon Yellow, Parchment, Black, Green, Ultramarine Blue, Wire base, Trivalent Chrome finish (as shown).

Eames Molded Fiberglass Side Chair shown in Red Orange, Wire base, Trivalent Chrome finish (left).

Eames Shell Chair Group

Designed by Charles and Ray Eames, 1950

The Eames Shell Chair exemplifies Charles and Ray’s desire to make “the best for the most for the least.” With each new form, finish, and configuration, they continued to push the boundaries of what the Shell Chair could be. Originally produced in fiberglass, the chair was later switched to 100 percent recyclable polypropylene, an environmentally minded alternative. Now, with advancements in safe fiberglass composition and dynamic veneer technologies, the evolution continues with the Molded Fiberglass and Molded Wood Shell Chairs. Today, there are limitless possibilities for creating seating that suits any space, formal or informal, and fits every body and every need.

Eames Upholstered Molded Plastic Side Chair shown in Green, Hopsak/Emerald Dark by Alexander Girard, Walnut Dowel base, Black finish (as shown).

Eames Molded Fiberglass Arm Chair shown in Green, Walnut Dowel base, Black finish (left).

Eames Molded Wood Chair

Designed by Charles and Ray Eames, 1950

Achieved with the help of today’s 3-D veneer technology, this authentic form is the result of a process that gives wood veneer the extra flexibility it needs in order to be molded into the complex curves of a single shell—realizing Charles and Ray’s effort to make a single-shell form out of wood. The side chair is available in white ash, walnut, ebony, and santos palisander, all of which pair with a range of base options that include wire, dowel leg, and 4-leg.

Eames Molded Wood Side Chair shown in Santos Palisander, Wire base, Black finish.

Central Table

Designed by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Magis, 2011

Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec’s objective was clear: create a simple, delicate table that is simultaneously utilitarian and durable, both indoors and out. Central Table, the result of their efforts, is a round or square, bistro-like surface that will gracefully coexist in a variety of environments—at home, in a workspace, or set in rows on a terrace or in a café. Small in stature and constructed for daily use, Central’s smart, flip-top folding system allows for quick, compact storage and nesting. The tripod base is available in black, white, or polished aluminum.

Central Table shown in Polished Aluminum finish.

Nelson X-Leg Table

Designed by George Nelson, 1950

The X-Leg Table is the basic expression of what a table should be. Designed by George Nelson to serve dining, working, and entertaining settings in equal measure, the table similarly welcomes a variety of seating styles—from a formal piece by Ward Bennett to a bright and poppy utilitarian Eames Shell Chair. Highly adaptable, the tables comes in two laminates and three surface veneers, including walnut, white ash, and santos palisander, all of which sit atop sturdy chrome legs, available in trivalent chrome, white, or black. Adjustable glides adapt to uneven floor surfaces.

Nelson X-Leg Table in White Ash veneer top, Trivalent Chrome base (as shown).

Nelson X-Leg Table in Walnut veneer top, Trivalent Chrome base (left).

Eames Molded Plastic Chair

Designed by Charles and Ray Eames, 1950

While the same single-shell form has endured throughout the years, the decision was made to switch the material to polypropylene when the detrimental effects of fiberglass became more widely understood. In addition to being 100 percent recyclable, the polypropylene molded shell chairs are highly durable, boast a subtle matte finish, and come in a variety of upholstered options—all specified with a sustainable adhesive. Faithfully reproduced to original specifications, the new Alexander Girard Hopsak fabrics are made from recycled polyester and come finished in a classic white, black, or parchment edge trim.

Eames Molded Plastic Side and Armchairs shown in Black, Red, Aqua Sky, and White, Walnut dowel base, Black finish (as shown).

Eames Molded Plastic Armchair shown in Aqua Sky, Wire base, Trivalent Chrome finish (left).

Osso Family

Designed by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Mattiazzi, 2011

As the French brothers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec see it, “The Osso Chair invites to be touched, even caressed, as it is extremely sculpted and polished thanks to the use of highly sophisticated digital control equipment.” Manufactured by Mattiazzi—a family-owned producer of wood furniture, in Udine, Italy—where they combine refined hands-on know-how with a powerful set of solar-powered CNC tools, every piece is assembled using chemical- and treatment-free wood panels. The collection of dining chairs, stools, and tables employs no hardware, allowing the joints to dovetail seamlessly, and is available in a complementary palette of nine different colors.

Osso Chairs, Stools, and Table shown in Natural Waxed Oak, Pink Waxed Ash, Dark Grey Waxed Ash, Green Waxed Ash finishes (as shown).

Osso Chair shown in Waxed Ash finish (left).

Branca Table

Designed by Sam Hecht and Kim Colin, 2009

Simple, but never plain, this table by Sam Hecht and Kim Colin skillfully combines technology and traditional handcraftsmanship to create an elegant, inviting surface. Topped with white lacquer, the table’s solid ash frame is sculpted to look delicate but remain strong.

Branca Table shown in Natural Waxed Ash (as shown).

Branca Table shown in White lacquered top, Natural Waxed Ash (left).

Nelson Thin Edge Buffett

Designed by George Nelson, 1946

These finely detailed cabinets represent yet another evolution in George Nelson’s thinking about storage. In 1952, Nelson developed a series of customizable pieces in rosewood, called the Rosewood Group. As the veneer range expanded and design details were standardized, the collection was again renamed, in 1958, this time after the feature that defines their unique aesthetic quality: the thin edge that frames the doors and drawers. This classic piece has been reissued and updated to employ environmentally sustainable veneers and finishing processes—without compromising the original design—using renewable woods like santos palisander, an option that honors and shares the rich personality and deep grain of rosewood.

Nelson Thin Edge Buffet shown in White Ash veneer, White pulls, Polished Aluminum base (as shown).

Nelson Thin Edge Buffet shown in Santos Palisander veneer, White pulls, Polished Aluminum base (left).

Envelope Chair

Designed by Ward Bennett for Geiger, 1966

Ward Bennett’s Envelope Chair is subtle, sophisticated, and aptly named for its clever design: a sling of upholstery wrapped around a welded, tubular steel frame to create the chair’s seat, sides, and back. An elegant choice for the home or office, the chair is available in a wide array of upholstery fabrics and leathers.

Envelope Chair shown in Stone/MCL Leather, Satin Chrome frame (as shown).

Envelope Chair shown in Black/MCL Leather, Satin Chrome frame (left).

Eames Table Segmented Base

Designed by Charles and Ray Eames, 1964

Like all designs by Charles and Ray Eames, this round table blends form and function, strength and beauty. Perfect for working or dining, it offers a classic segmented aluminum base and three tabletop sizes in laminate and veneer options. Versatile and durable, it is a classic that has endured for almost fifty years.

Eames Table Segmented Base shown in Santos Palisander veneer top, Black column, Polished Aluminum base (as shown).

Eames Table Universal Base shown in Georgia Grey stone top, Black column, Black base (left).

Bumper Side Chair

Designed by Ward Bennett for Geiger, 1966

Known for his unimpeachable material sensibility and minimalist designs, Ward Bennett delighted in modernizing classic forms. His iconic Bumper Chair, for example, was based on George Washington’s 18th century swivel chair. With its short seat and notable lumbar support—an especially important feature to Bennett, who suffered from back pain and studied anatomy—the Bumper Chair is a bucket seat in the most classic sense.

The versatile 4-leg side chair version is equally at home around a dining table and in a café or lounge setting, and the stately Bumper Conference Chair, with its 5-star caster base in polished aluminum, adds ease and comfort to any meeting room. A lounge chair with a 4-leg plated-metal base is also available.

Bumper Side Chair arm and cushion shown in Stone/MCL leather, Shell shown in Stone/Double Beam from Geiger Textiles, Satin Chrome base

AGL Table

Designed by Leon Ransmeier, 2012

American designer Leon Ransmeier brings grace and utility to an everyday form with the AGL Table Group—an infinitely versatile design that fits seamlessly into home or office. Named for the aeronautical term “above ground level,” which describes an airborne aircraft’s position in relation to the ground, the design is founded on proximity, sociability, and comfort. AGL is available in nine sizes, each 28.5 inches high, and comes in a range of surface options, including veneer, Formcoat, and natural stone.

AGL Table shown in White Ash veneer, White understructure, Polished Aluminum base (as shown).

AGL Table shown in White Ash veneer, White understructure, White base (left).

Eames Aluminum Group Management Chair

Designed by Charles and Ray Eames, 1958, 1969

Since their inception, in 1958, as outdoor seating for industrialist J. Irwin Miller’s Columbus, Indiana, home, Eames Aluminum Group chairs are welcome anywhere that comfort and style are required. The management chair, outfitted with a 4-star base, is especially suited for dining and meeting settings, and comes in a variety of textile and leather upholstery options, as well as powder-coated frame finishes.

Eames Aluminum Group Management Chairs shown in Terra Cotta, Violet Dark, Sienna, Olive Green Dark, Ochre Dark, Ultramarine Dark, Yellow Dark, Cobalt Blue, Grey Blue Dark, Emerald Dark/Hopsak by Alexander Girard, Polished Aluminum frame (as shown).

Eames Aluminum Group Management Chair shown in Sienna/Hopsak by Alexander Girard, Polished Aluminum frame (left).

Solo Family

Designed by Nitzan Cohen for Mattiazzi, 2012

A circle and arc unite simply in Nitzan Cohen’s playful take on the classic café chair and barstool, cheerfully inviting guests to take a seat while evoking a sense of visual lightness and utility. Like its name suggests, Solo is a singular, well-rounded answer to a number of dining and living needs. Both the indoor and outdoor versions of the Solo Chair, Stool, and Table are available in ash (aniline-stained or thermo-treated) or natural waxed oak. The indoor Solo Chair can also be upholstered in leather, adding a touch of luxury to an already robust range of colors.

Solo Chairs shown in Neon Blue Anilin Ash, Solo Tables shown in Natural Waxed Oak and Blue/Black Anilin Ash, and Solo Stools shown in Natural Waxed Ash frame, White stool ring (as shown).

Solo Chair shown in Neon Blue Anilin Ash (left).

Burdick Group Table

Designed by Bruce Burdick, 1980

Described by Burdick as “workbenches for executives,” these tables were originally intended for offices and are ideal for high-traffic settings and impromptu work sessions, but are equally gracious in home dining rooms, thanks to their endlessly flexible design. A dramatic aluminum beam supplies the table’s basic structural and visual element. All the components are cantilevered from, suspended below, or supported directly on the beam, and wires can be hidden beneath this central support. Each glass, aluminum, and steel table can be arranged in different sizes and configurations, allowing easy adaptation to the demands of a space.

Burdick Group Table shown in Glass, Georgia White marble ends, Polished Aluminum bracket supports, White column, Polished Aluminum base (as shown).

Burdick Group Table shown in Glass, Polished Aluminum bracket supports, Black column, Polished Aluminum base (left).

She Said Stool

Designed by Nitzan Cohen for Mattiazzi, 2011

Nitzan Cohen’s subtly curved She Said Stool is a graceful example of solid-wood craftsmanship at its finest. Its sleek silhouette serves as a testament to Mattiazzi’s advanced technology: the backrest and long legs display a smooth and seamless geometry often attained in plastic chairs alone. Artful and refined, it fits comfortably in a workroom or in a breakfast, cocktail, or café/bar setting, home or office.

She Said Stool shown in White Anilin Ash