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Herman Miller Select 2011 Edition

What's In It For You

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Product Story

We've always loved the sleek elegance of George Nelson's tray table. To update the look of the mid-century original, done in walnut or teak veneer, we used white ash, finished with a process that arrests the wood in its natural, freshly cut state. The resulting color is a creamy white that resists yellowing over time.

A brushed stainless steel column and black umber steel legs support the tray top. The top is also available as a tray only. The table stands 17 inches high; the tray top is 18 inches in diameter. As with the original, the 2011 Select edition is presented in a special take-home container about the size of a pizza box.

The inlay design juxtaposes walnut and santos palisander veneers in each diamond shape. Five-ply veneer construction, with inner plies of bay poplar, ensures the top remains stable through changes in humidity and years of use.

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Easy Assembly

Assembling the Tray Table is simple. Start by interlocking the two leg sections and the column. Next, insert the tension rod through the bottom of the column, hooking the three interlocking sections together. Finally, turn the threaded end of the tension rod into the "spider" attached to the underside of the top.

Design Story

Nelson Tray Table

This limited-edition tray table was inspired by George Nelson's mid-century masterpiece, the Flock of Butterflies clock. Manufactured in polished aluminum with a design meant to evoke butterflies in flight, the clock was first shown in a 1962 collection displayed at the Chicago Merchandise Mart and called Clocks Ahead of Time.

Nelson Tray Table

George Nelson

George Nelson was always ahead of timeā€”his and ours. From the practicality of Storagewall to the whimsy of a marshmallow sofa and coconut chair, Nelson was always looking ahead. The versatile and streamlined tray table, which looked nothing like the "occasional tables" present in most mid-century American homes, was another step he took in leading the way into modern design.

George Nelson
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